Stas Borodin

Stas Borodin

Fine Artist

Russia


Saint-Petersburg artist, Stas Borodin is a plein air painter who travels the world and exhibits most everywhere he stops. He likes traveling and travels often. He sees it as a form of an active artistic life.


His paintings are a world of colour harmony. They comprise of the integrity of a plein-air perception of the atmosphere, a mise en valeur vision (the subtleties of light and colour relationships, transmitting the feeling of air and space) and soft tone transitions. Everything is based on nuances – both the colour scheme and the mood.


To appreciate Borodin’s work, one must take time to enter into his realm. His work grows on you with time. He captures the transient seen as eternity. It is timeless. Perhaps that is the best way to sum up the first impressions of his paintings in just a few words. Delicately discreet, dim but very light, they possess a magical attraction. They create a contemplative mood. It is almost impossible to enter the artist’s world in a rush. But if you have time enough, you will see the beauty and grandeur of nature, the quiet life of objects, the spirituality and inner concentration of his models. There are only three themes in Borodin’s work: portrait, still life, and landscape.


Borodin is a worshipper of nature who must express his perception of the world. Therefore he needs to find his own “well chosen artistic means”. The artist has always felt close to the great traditions of the French plein-air school of the 19th-20th centuries, nearly forgotten in today’s painting. They helped his talent grow stronger and enter into a grand art life.


It must be noted that Stas Borodin only paints from nature, which is a great rarity nowadays. His work method is a system of special colour construction of the painting. He goes from abstraction to the form, from pure colour to the finest nuances of near similar tones. He paints not an object on canvas, but a space filled with light and air. The light in his works fills the whole polyphony of undertones with the force of life. The luminosity of colour is manifold and expressive.


He creates a synthesis of being and becoming. In his paintings, reality appears peculiarly primeval, removed from the ordinary. There are no people in it, no details of the present day, it is an ideal image characterized by eternal categories, but it is experienced in a very intimate way.


He talks of his plein-air work with much poetry: “as I travel, I paint in the studio under the open sky, sometimes dipping my brushes in the rays of sunshine, dew-drops, rain currents, the ringing frosty air”. Borodin is rarely attracted by “gala views”. He finds his own motifs, discovering a picturesque angle in the most unprepossessing corner.



His works are known in Germany, Sweden, Belgium, Slovakia, Spain, Israel, Cuba, England, France, and the USA. His paintings have been purchased by museums, corporative and private collectors.



Andre Mila Critique

New York Daily News


To say that I am a Stas Borodin aficionado is definitely an understatement. My family, my friends and acquaintances know that any time the artist is in the United States, especially in the tri-State area of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, I make certain that I attend the exhibition of the art that he has brought to show.


I met this Russian Impressionist more than a decade ago, while working at the New York Daily News, and it was love of the sea -- as he captured it -- at first sight. He came to the office with a few plein-air paintings he had done while traveling across the USA on his annual visit here, as I learned later. The seascapes hit a note of such yearning in me that, to this day, I can still feel it every time I think back to that first encounter. From that day on, I have looked forward to seeing the sea through Stas' eyes and have yet to be disappointed. Luckily, since the artist's visits to my part of the world are an annual occurrence (and I hope will continue to the end of my life), my eyes can enjoy the ebb and flow of the waters in different parts of our planet as caught by Stas' brushstroke!  Mind you, there is much more variety to his paintings: still life, portraits, landscapes, buildings, trees -- during every season -- all come to life when caught by the magic that the artist possesses; but my love will remain his never-ending sea.  Perhaps the feeling dates to my childhood in the former Soviet Union and my late mother's stories about her honeymoon on the Black Sea, oh so long ago, or some primal feeling of man's beginnings but, whatever the case may be, Stas' seascapes have touched my Russian soul in a way that cannot be explained. I am forever grateful for the day Stas Borodin walked into my life with a gift of the sea!